I Love Lucy’s Feminism “In Deed” and Beyond Words

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Last week in my “Sell Me Something Workshop” I brought in American grand dame Lucille Ball in the TV, advertisement and comedic classic: VITAMEATAVEGAMIN.   We learned from what Lucy (McGuillicuddy Ricardo) did masterfully in her “sales pitch” and from what she bungled for “not knowing her product.”  This episode is so cherished that a gentleman walking down the corridor couldn’t help but come in and join us.  He was belly laughing, as was I.  Lucy’s authenticity – her gestures and her expressions – speaks right to your heart.  And, from the business, entertainment and media perspectives, Lucy’s impact on TV and comediennes thereafter is nothing short of stunning.  Take,  for example,  this Queens native’s favorite, The Nanny, brought to life by Fran Drescher.

But above all, I am thinking now about Lucy’s subtle and sophisticated contribution to us women in the workforce and in the business world more broadly.  In this episode are men’s inflammatory references to “the girl” and her husband Ricky’s sexist frowning on her career and her use of her maiden name professionally.  He even scolds her – publicly no less – for defying his wishes.  Yet, in the scenes – and behind them – is a woman who is undeterred and unflappable.  In velvet gloves, high heels and a pill-box hat was a trailblazer who produced, starred-in and made iconic a TV phenomenon – and brought along a crew of colleagues.  Both the character she played – and the woman she was – forged forward in professional life and as a wonderful wife, mother, friend, colleague and business partner.  She did it all.

As a younger woman, I missed the satire for the comedy.  Now, as a gal on the other side of life’s heavy lifting – childrearing and career- building – I am reminded that progress and feminism take many forms.   Now, I see the satire through the clarity of the rear view mirror.  Now, I have fallen in love with Lucy all over again – not blindly, but panoramically.

Lisa Bernard has prepared and represented people from all walks of life to speak publicly at meetings, on panels, in their places of worship and as keynoters. She herself has addressed audiences as large as 2000 and designed and delivered over 500 workshops, seminars and college-level courses on oral communication.  She has slowed down fast-talkers, turned “uhmers” into smooth-speakers and moderated accents from Brooklyn to Beijing – all to develop confident communicators.  Lisa has a Masters Degree in International Affairs from Columbia University and today manages Lisa Bernard’s SecuritySpeak, LLC, a consulting firm that makes available experts on national, global and cyber-security for distinguished lectures worldwide.  You can reach her at (203) 293-4741 or LisaBernard@SecuritySpeak.net and like her firm at www.Facebook.com/PodiumTime.

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What a Recipe Name Reveals about Dignity and Fine Dining

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I am excited for this evening. It’s my barn’s holiday party and there’s much fun ahead –   from seeing my fellow equestrians trade-in their jeans and boots for holiday attire to enjoying ourselves by the fireplace as winter sets in and clips our time together on the trials.  Frankly, I am also looking forward to the fare.  A happy pescetarian, I pre-ordered the “scrod puttanesca.”  And when I did, the root of “puttanesca” jumped out at me as “puttana” in the vernacular Italian means “prostitute.”  Curious, I looked up the origins of the recipe to see if this is a coincidence or if there is a connection between prostitution and my meal tonight.  Turns out, there is.

Apparently, “puttanesca sauce” was developed by Italian prostitutes who wanted a fast-cooking and spicy gravy to complement the mild-flavored fish they prepared and ate in the little time they had between clients.  I love this.  I have always attributed my zest for fine food and commitment to eating well to the Mediterranean dimension of my heritage.  My Italian relatives respected meals and celebrated food as do I and as do my daughters.  However busy we are, we make time to prepare our food.  Three meals a day – each made with fresh ingredients.  I even laugh at myself as I write this and reflect on my breakfast today.  As the sun was rising and the coffee brewing, I was chopping Vidalia onions and roasted red peppers and fresh mozzarella for my omelette.  Eggs, a dash of grated Locatelli cheese, fresh-cracked pepper, some ribboned basil and there I have it – today or any other day of the work week.  And as I flipped it onto to my dish, I smiled nostalgically thinking of my late grandfather, Phillip, who never, ever ate on paper or plastic.  In my grandparents’ home, meals were plated – period.  That’s the dignity in dining that makes you a life – whatever you do for a living.

Lisa Bernard has prepared and represented people from all walks of life to speak publicly at meetings, on panels, in their places of worship and as keynoters. She herself has addressed audiences as large as 2000 and designed and delivered over 500 workshops, seminars and college-level courses on oral communication.  She has slowed down fast-talkers, turned “uhmers” into smooth-speakers and moderated accents from Brooklyn to Beijing – all to develop confident communicators.  Lisa has a Masters Degree in International Affairs from Columbia University and today manages Lisa Bernard’s SecuritySpeak, LLC, a consulting firm that makes available experts on national, global and cyber-security for distinguished lectures worldwide.  You can reach her at (203) 293-4741 or LisaBernard@SecuritySpeak.net and like her firm at www.Facebook.com/PodiumTime.

Make Your Message Memorable: Speak “Synoptically” This Season

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Calling all panelists, presenters, keynoters and hosts!  It’s October and conference season is upon us!  Are you ready?  Are you confident?  Is your message memorable?  At the risk of over-simplifying, my suggestion for making the points in your presentation more resonant will help not only your listeners remember your words of wisdom, but also help you to deliver them without notes and with greater confidence.  What’s the tip?  Speak your main points synoptically.  Crystallize your key content into sentences that are crisp, comprehensive and companionable with the human ear.   Listen as you say aloud the following examples.

Talking gets the appointment; listening makes the sale.

When it comes to retirement, if you fail to plan then you are planning to fail.

Content, digital, social media and more: marketing is still everything and everything is still marketing.

Hear it?

A dash of rhetoric will enhance the sound of your synoptic phrasing.  Select a device that is consistent with the tenor of the point you are making.  If it’s light and playful then alliteration is a candidate: Today, there’s a bounty of botanicals to beat the winter blues and blahs!  Is your point comprehensive?  Try chiasmus for that “final-word-on-the-subject” sound:  Distance learning is the future of education and the education of the future.”  Is your presentation revelatory?  Juxtaposition works naturally: New research shows that small talk plays a big role in long-term negotiations.  Is your point counter-intuitive or complex?  The simplicity of rhythm and rhyme will be welcome: Be curious not furious when you encounter hostility in a meeting.  Whichever device you deploy, a synoptic affirmation of your key points prepares your audience perfectly to hear your illustrations, elaborations and substantiations in the development of the points you make.

My fellow orators, when we convert our main points into phrases our audiences can quote, we benefit as well.  We internalize our lines faster and easier so we rely less, if at all, on notes at the podium.   These boost our confidence in our messaging and presentation skills.  Recall how extemporaneously without notes and assuredly the following were delivered as you finish these indelible and synoptic phrases yourself:

” My fellow Americans, ask not what you country can do for you, ask  …”

“That’s one small step for [a] man, one  …”

“Give me liberty or  …”

I wish you each a season of speaking that promotes your ideas, analyses, businesses and books to your personal best and with maximum benefit to our society.   Viva voce!

A professional speaker and communications coach for over 25 years, Lisa Bernard now offers master classes in Audience AnalysisPreparing and Conducting a Professional Q&A Session, and Extemporaneous Public Speaking.  She is currently President of Lisa Bernard’s SecuritySpeak, LLC, a speakers bureau devoted to her passion – the intersection of oratory and international affairs.  Her experts address audiences on matters of cyber, national and global security matters.  This follows her 20 year tenure as President of Word of Mouth, Inc. a full-service communications firm based in Westport, CT, that provided speech-writing, accent modification, interview prep, media training and customized seminar services in listening skills, meeting management and public speaking to clients worldwide.  Lisa began her communications career with the founding of Foreign Affairs Speakers Bureau in 1989 in New York City.  She is the author of a series of affordable and self-help guidebooks called NOTES from the PODIUM and still devotes one day a week to teaching at the college level in her hometown of Queens, NY.  She can be reached at (203) 293-4741 or at LisaBernard@SecuritySpeak.net.   Like her firm on Facebook at http://www.Facebook.com/PodiumTime.   Learn more about her work at http://www.SecuritySpeak.net and access her expertise at http://www.CueCardCommunications.com and via her blog, Security Briefs at http://www.SecuriITyBriefs.Blogspot.com.

 

 

Organic Language? Yes – Raw, Unedited and Deliciously Revealing

AutumnOctober2015Twice so far this October I have been blessed with an “occurrence” that us Muggles attempt to engineer but often simply cannot. On the first two Friday nights of this month I was able to welcome the Sabbath at a place of a natural lull in my work. That is, by 5:00 p.m. my professional dealings were at a place where a pause was organically occurring.  Emails wished, “Have a great weekend.”  Texts read, “Catch you on Monday.”  Friends called and said, “See you Sunday.”  And most welcome was that my thoughts were quelled.  My brain was down-shifting.  My mind was at peace with the week’s workload behind me on the “I got this done” list rather than the “to do” list.  There were no remaining unreturned messages as irritating to my entrepreneurial temperament as a dangling participle to a grammarian.  I could be fully present with those I love and in the activities that define my social and spiritual selves.

This week I was not as fortunate.  I am in the marble of sculpting a new business and the actualization of my vision has its own timetable and in the age of technology is unbound by our minds’ markers of day and night, work and rest.  By Friday at noon I knew my work week was not over and I was in for a restless ride north to visit with my daughter as I could hear my phone buzzing and humming.   Such disparate experiences the cacophony of modern business sounds and the visual buffet of autumn foliage in New England.  And the third dimension of my own revelations as I digested the week’s current events – Putin in Syria, Presidential debates, terrorist attacks in Israel ….   The world is on fire it seems and my new business concerns itself with such matters.  But I managed.  I pulled over and parked my brain and my car safely and returned calls, emails and texts before artificially “powering down” and fully embracing the beauty of my daughter upon arrival.

But I couldn’t trick my brain for long.  No amount of skilled time and resource management can substitute for rest.  They only facilitate it.  I know this but indulged in the vice of denial anyway.  Like a physics experiment in inertia I got home from Massachusetts and began crafting the menu for my week’s food – high grade fuel, really, for demanding days in construction of my venture. Lentil soup topped the list.  It’s protein packed and heats up fast after a long day.  Perfect!   What a plan!  Am I a champ or what?  I’ll even share with my daughter, a New Yorker, another alpha, health-conscious professional.   I texted:

“Making us a vat of lentil soup: organic, non-fat, vegetarian and Putin-free.”

It took my tired brain a moment to figure out what looked “off” in my text.   When I got it, I put away my ingredients and headed to the couch for a much-needed nap.

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Lisa Bernard has prepared and represented people from all walks of life to speak publicly at meetings, on panels, in their places of worship and as keynoters. She herself has addressed audiences as large as 2000 and designed and delivered over 500 workshops, seminars and college-level courses on oral communication.  She has slowed down fast-talkers, turned “uhmers” into smooth-speakers and moderated accents from Brooklyn to Beijing – all to develop confident communicators.  Lisa has a Masters Degree in International Affairs from Columbia University and today manages Lisa Bernard’s SecuritySpeak, LLC, a consulting firm that makes available experts on national, global and cyber-security for distinguished lectures worldwide.  You can reach her at (203) 293-4741 or LisaBernard@SecuritySpeak.net and like her firm at www.Facebook.com/PodiumTime.

More than Meets the Mouth: How Food Conveys Messages and Memories

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Two years ago at secular New Year I mused about my observation that food does, in fact, communicate. In this Jewish New Year of 5776, I was struck by how food communicates. Like any responsible modern pundit, I googled “communication” as a point of departure of sorts and my license to proceed popped up as definition #2: a “means of connection between people or places, in particular.” Bingo. Food provides a “means of connection between people or places” –geographically, and across time.

For instance, when I pulled out my late friend Elyse’s mouth-watering and family favorite recipe for apple kuchen (cake) to prepare it for Jewish New Year, that handwritten recipe transported me back to her tiny kitchen in Israel where she dictated it to me from memory. I treasure it now—the physical notes I wrote with the pen she handed me. The lined 5” x 4” pad on which I wrote her every word and which is now stained with the coffee we drank that day and the oils from the margarine that I cream together with sugar and cinnamon each New Year as I remember her and commemorate her culinary skills. Actually, it’s not her skills but rather the unabashed love with which she cooked for her family and friends. Her apple kuchen is an “oral tribute” of sorts – not a speech, not a eulogy, but something much more visceral and eternal– aromas and tastes that rejoin us year after year.  And my friend Deborah and her family are part of that now as well. Their enjoyment of her recipe occasions me to tell them about Elyse, to “introduce” her to them, in essence, posthumously.

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Interesting that this year as I was trucking through the tedium of washing, peeling, coring and chopping the half dozen apples that Elyse’s recipe requires I realized that my dislike of those processes is also a message of love. You couldn’t pay me to do it. But I did it, and I do it, because to prepare delicious holiday food for those we love is to connect them to our rituals and our faith and our bonds as human beings. Even—and maybe especially—the unpleasantries of food prep, dare I say, facilitate connection. I think about Elyse doubling and tripling her recipes for her large family.   And when my daughter saw me grimacing as I cored the apples, she learned that her culinary pleasure comes at a cost.   She said as much. And, we chuckled together reminiscing about her phone call to me the first—and last—time she prepared herself a roast chicken for dinner. She had just finished cleaning it when she rang me and said, “That was the most disgusting thing I have ever done! I can’t believe you did that each Friday night for twenty-plus years for Shabbat dinner!” I can. The labors of love and connection echo in food preparation. That traditional meal connected me to my faith, my children, their late father, and our faith’s rituals. The meal whispered, “We know who we are.”

As I write this on the eve of a ritual fast for Yom Kippur, I realize, too that the absence of food facilitates connections as well. The escape from food shopping, preparation, consumption and cleanup leave me free to devote my thoughts and feelings to G-d and my atonement. I know that from years of fasting. As well, I know that hunger—the deprivation of food as physical sustenance—is a painful and uncomfortable experience. I get a headache. My maladies are more pronounced. Thirst, in particular, challenges me on my walk to synagogue, then distracts me and later preoccupies me.   So as I write on the eve of the Yom Kippur fast I expect that both my empathy and my sympathy for hungry people—the homeless, refugees fleeing violence on foot or by boat, farm workers and migrants denied the predictable daily meals someone like myself can take for granted—will multiply and my “micro-charity” will increase.  They commit me to bring the sandwich and beverage to the farmhand who delivers grain and water to my horse and to make the extra effort to drop off food at the local men’s shelter—as an equal priority in my regular, busy “first-world” schedule.   The debilitation of my fast will remind me of how human food—with its need to be transported and washed and cooked and presented—requires us to invest so much more time and resources in it than other mammals need to do. I see my horse accessing his forage so effortlessly; I open the gate, he exits and sniffs the ground and greenery and flora and assesses what is safe and nutritious at his “all you can eat buffet.” And then he eats. It’s that simple.  Whereas for me, a complicated “human” – Oy! My lunch must be shopped for, prepared, packed on ice, wrapped up and eaten “safely” or at least “cleanly” with utensils. The least I can do is double my effort and feed the human being who fills the trough while my horse grazes. That sandwich and bottle of water connects us. And, they say “a lot,” I hear. They say, “I notice you, I care about your well-being, I can alleviate or help avoid your discomfort.”

Food is an impressive communicator in my book. It is multilingual, speaking the languages of love, memory, tradition, faith, family, friendship and compassion through the dialects of hard work, sharing and repetition—all in all, connecting us to one another—past and present—and across the globe.

Lisa Bernard has prepared and represented people from all walks of life to speak publicly at meetings, on panels and as keynoters. She has addressed audiences as large as 2000 and designed and delivered over 500 workshops, seminars and college courses on oral communication.  She has slowed down fast-talkers, turned “uhmers” into smooth-speakers and moderated accents from Brooklyn to Beijing – all to develop confident communicators.  Lisa has a Masters Degree in International Affairs from Columbia University and today manages Lisa Bernard’s SecuritySpeak, LLC, a consulting firm that makes available experts on national, global and cyber-security for distinguished lectures worldwide.  You can reach her at (203) 293-4741 or LisaBernard@SecuritySpeak.net and like her firm at www.Facebook.com/PodiumTime.

Minding our Ps and Qs: The Legacies of People and their Quotations

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I have spent much of June editing an anthology of quotations for use by public speakers.   It is a joy.   I am immersed in the wit and wisdom of those of great renown – from Aristotle to Zig Zigler – each of whom offers us the chance to feel connected to the human journey by relating their timeless sentiments and keen observations about life expressed in fantastically “user-friendly” snippets.   Quotations are their legacies and we avail ourselves of them with impact and pride when we speak for work, in our communities and our places of worship.   And as we remember them, their words resonate with our listeners.   Quotations from the titans of the arts, world affairs, sports, literature and other distinctly human endeavors work like magic; the right one can instantly focus an audience or change the mood in the room.  Over the twenty-five years I’ve worked with orators, the use of quotations has been bankable for making us sound smarter than our experiences and more educated than our degrees.  Their pearls do more than adorn our remarks; they contribute to the precision and reception of our messages.  The sparkle of their eloquence polishes our own.  Quoting those who came before us is a win-win-win exercise.

I am also grateful for the good humor of my family, friends and associates during this project as my enthusiasm occasions me to send them the quotations I deem pertinent to whatever they enjoy, feel or might be doing this summer.  My girlfriend received Marilyn Monroe’s priceless, “I’m selfish, impatient and a little insecure. I make mistakes, I am out of control and at times hard to handle. But if you can’t handle me at my worst, then you sure as hell don’t deserve me at my best.”  My cousin opened an email that shared the Sicilian proverb, Only the spoon knows what’s stirring the pot. And my beau and fellow empty-nester was the recipient of Mr. Roger’s, “Parenting forces us to get to know ourselves better than we ever might have imagined we could.  We’ll discover talents we never dreamed we had … and as time goes on, we’ll probably discover that we have more to give and can give more than we ever imagined.”  On my LinkedIn page I have called for and received my colleagues’ most cherished quotations. Their participation is an exciting and unexpected plus to my already enjoyable work.

But there is another gift this project has brought me.  And that is the realization that what we mere muggles say – here and now – in our lifetimes, in our private lives – has the potential to resonate with future generations and with deeply meaningful consequences.  This summer has been rich for me with my family “quoting me back to me” with appreciation.  Last month, I was in an awkward spot when a friend asked me for help at a time when my own deadlines and commitments were pushing the limits of feasibility.  Yet, I was uncomfortable saying a flat out, “no.”  It was my twenty-one year old daughter who, in sensing my unease, jumped in and said, “Mom, ’no’ is the most important word in an adult’s vocabulary.  The ability to say ‘no’ when we are overburdened is the very reason we can later say ‘yes.’”  She sounded so mature.  And I said as much.  And she replied, “You taught me that.  You say it whenever I am overwhelmed with school and work and need to recharge.”

This week, my brother made me ecstatic when he quoted me from a day of tremendous significance for him some twenty-one years ago.  He had come to my (now late) husband and me to share that he was gay and about to come out to the family.  He expressed concern about how life would go for him and I said (as he quoted me back to me), “Your life will be wonderful because it will be honest.”  In response to my brother’s concerns about how the family would take his news, my husband—without hesitation—said, “If there is anyone who doesn’t support you or brings negative energy, just let them step-aside.“ Twenty one years later my brother is successful in every respect and a genuinely happily married man and sharing with me the maxims that made such a difference to him as he navigated the unchartered waters of the last two, very significant decades.  I am so grateful I said what I said.  I didn’t just think it.  I said it out loud.  I spoke and he heard me.  That is effective communication.  And it made a difference for someone I love.

Given my work on the quotations anthology, the irony is not lost on me that two giants – Dr. Seuss and Bernard Baruch – have both had the following words attributed to them: “Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don’t matter and those who matter don’t mind.”  I will continue my professional due diligence and get to rightful source of that sage phrase, but here, first, I note that my late husband’s expression of that axiom is what made an indelible and pivotal impact on my brother’s personal journey.  That’s a legacy.  That’s the kind us muggles can leave so they remember us, so they quote us, and so they feel confidently connected to the journey larger than their own – while we are here and then when we are gone.

Lisa Bernard is editing an anthology of quotations, proverbs and aphorisms for Cue Card Communications (www.CueCardCommunications.com) and wants to know, “What quotation, adage or proverb speaks to you?” 

Viva Voce! Three Steps to Move You from Scientist to Storyteller and from Researcher to Narrator as You Defend Your Thesis

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Did you schedule your Viva?  Great!  Now let’s stop worrying and start talking it up.  Yep.  In the first post on Viva Voce I proffered the notion that you “write” your thesis for the “experts” but you “tell the story” of your thesis to “all in attendance” at your Viva.  You may feel some anxiety about this.  That’s normal.  It was astronaut Sally Ride who said, “When you’re getting ready to launch into space, you’re sitting on a big explosion waiting to happen.”  You are about to be launched into liberation from the intensity of your sophisticated research and writing and you can sense it.  You are also about to face an audience of your mentors, examiners, peers and possibly members of the press and others who can apply your findings to their work.  Yikes!  Exhale and realize that the heavy-lifting is behind you.  Now it’s time to simply tell the story.  You are converting here from scientist to storyteller, from researcher to narrator.  You got this!  You know this story!  And you appreciate how powerful a narrator can be.  (Think Morgan Freeman in The Shawshank Redemption and March of the Penguins.)  And there are just three steps to a failsafe Viva.

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1) Start Talking and Recording.   Writing and speaking are two distinct media, so let’s start transitioning from writer to narrator by taking out your mobile phone and selecting a recording app.  Why record yourself?   Your recording is to your words like a glass jar is to fireflies.  You can capture them and examine them.   If you examine your words and sense you can do better, delete them and have another go at it.  On the other hand, when something comes out of your mouth and sounds good, you got it.   Now go ahead, speak up!  You may feel self-conscious and you likely don’t appreciate the sound of your own voice – but neither is an excuse or an obstacle to skillful preparation of your Viva. 

Where to begin?  Start with an Introduction of about six sentences to acquaint the listener with your project.  Be bold in this Introduction.  State clearly who you are in the field and the title of your work.  Share your motivations for your research.  Be gracious.  Credit the people whose work inspired you in the first place.  Speak about those who guided you along the way.  Thank them for their roles and contributions to your progress and ideas.  Then begin the story with the day you realized what you would explore for your thesis.  Remember that exciting moment?  Describe it with enthusiasm.

Next, share your Methodology.  Make a clear affirmation describing your approach.  Elaborate a bit, but use your judgment about just how much more you need to tell people given that there’s a Q&A session during which you can provide more information and details if listeners request them.

Then it’s on to the fun stuff – your Results.  State your findings clearly in language that non-experts can understand.  Sounding like Sheldon Cooper won’t help and sounding like the guy or gal next door goes a very long way when the community already knows you’re smart.  And don’t skimp on the humor.  Most projects have bumps and bad days and setbacks that are comical in retrospect.  Don’t be shy about sharing these vignettes as they are humanizing and make your message memorable.

Finally, bring your listeners to the end of your story.  Resolve the plot.  Summarize.  Put your hard work into perspective and place your thesis among the works that define your field.

2) Transcribe and Translate.  Yep, type up your recording in full.  Then review your transcript.  Comb it for each and every scientific, field-specific piece of jargon from your discipline’s lexicon and highlight them all in yellow.

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Then translate the highlighted words and phrases into laymen’s terms for those at your Viva who are not experts in your field.   Be a “simultaneous translator” so all those in attendance – experts and non-experts – can keep pace with your presentation.

3) Record and Rehearse.  Record your revised Viva and transcribe this polished version.  Then rehearse – aloud.  If you are presenting in a standing position, practice your Viva aloud from a standing position.  If you will be seated, practice aloud from a sitting position.  You breathe according to your body’s position so get accustomed to the way you feel as you stand or sit when narrating the story of your thesis.

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How many rehearsals?  About a dozen, including at least one dress-rehearsal in the attire you will wear for your Viva.  You will feel more confident when groomed, dressed and accessorized like a professional.  What to do with your recording?  Listen to it as often as you can between rehearsals.  Work your brain’s wiring:  just as you learn songs by hearing them repeatedly and singing along, you can internalize your presentation by hearing it often and telling it repeatedly.  You’ll know your Viva presentation “by heart” and can deliver it as well as the guests at your celebration will serenade you with “For s/he’s a jolly good fellow … that, nobody can deny!”   They’ve heard and sang it often enough to deliver it right on cue as you enter the party following your successful Viva.

This post is second in a series of three that began with “Viva Voce!  Now Doesn’t that Sound Nicer than ‘Defending Your Thesis?’”   Stayed tuned for the third and final piece, “Viva Voce!  Conducting  Your Q&A with Confidence.”   The series is an adaptation of a two-part workshop Lisa Bernard conducted for senior femme scientifiques in the Program of Neuroscience & Behavior in the Department of Psychology at Barnard College at Columbia University. 

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Lisa Bernard has prepared and represented people from all walks of life to speak publicly at meetings, on panels, in their places of worship and as keynoters.  She herself has addressed audiences as large as 2000 and designed and delivered over 500 workshops, seminars and college-level courses on oral communication.  She has slowed down fast-talkers, turned “uhmers” into smooth-speakers and moderated accents from Brooklyn to Beijing – all to develop confident communicators.  Lisa has a Masters Degree in International Affairs from Columbia University and today manages Lisa Bernard’s SecuritySpeak, LLC, a consulting firm that makes available experts on national, global and cyber-security for distinguished lectures worldwide.  You can reach her at (203) 293-4741 or LisaBernard@SecuritySpeak.net and like her firm at www.Facebook.com/PodiumTime.